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Yogi recipe: vegan pumpkin carrot soup

I love making soup, it’s very easy & satisfying as you can make lots with little effort. You can combine it with quinoa, rice, bread, …  to have a very filling main meal. Every season has its distinct vegetables to enjoy different types of soup all year round. I often just use one or two different veggies in a recipe and don’t even bother to use broth. I prefer to use spices, such as turmeric, cumin, paprika and Herbamare salt & black pepper as well as fresh herbs to bring out the taste of the veggies.

If like me, you always make way too much soup, then surely don’t hesitate to freeze the left-overs in portion sizes to have some nice food readily available to take to your work or for some other good reason.

This recipe is for approximately 10 servings & ready in ~35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 kg chopped pumpkin
  • 1 kg carrots
  • 1 piece of fresh ginger
  • 250ml Provamel Bio Soya Cuisine cream or coconut milk
  • 3 l (filtered) water
  • 70 g vegetable stock powder (to taste/ optional)
  • Fresh coriander
  • Black pepper & Herbamare/ Sea or Himalaya salt

Pumpkin carrot soup

Preparation
Cut the pumpkin and carrots into cubes. Peel the ginger and cut it into pieces or grate it.
Place all vegetables in a large pot. Add the water and bring to the boil.
Add the stock powder. Let it simmer on low heat until the vegetables are tender.
Remove the pan from the heat source and mix the soup with a blender.
Season with pepper & salt. Add the Soya Cuisine cream or coconut milk and stir well & let it simmer a little longer. Finish with a few coriander leaves.

TIP
If you buy organic produce, you can leave the skin of the pumpkin & carrots on (less work!), just make sure to wash them well (optional: use a vegetable brush).


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Yogi recipe: vegan dahl

As a first yogi recipe, I’d like to share the most common Indian dish: rice and dahl. A typical dahl is composed of some type of lentils, water, mustard seeds, lots of spices and often carrots, ginger and coriander. It’s a very easy dish to prepare and very filling as well. I never cook dahl just for one meal or person, mostly I cook enough for several meals or people.

Ingredients (serves 2/3)

1 cup of lentils (red or yellow)
2 or 3 carrots sliced
A piece of fresh ginger, grated
1 tsp of mustard seeds
1 tsp of coriander seeds (optional)
1 bay leave
2 tsp of turmeric powder
1 tsp of cumin powder
1/2 tsp of garam masala powder
Salt & pepper to taste
Water
Some wedges of lemon or lime
Fresh coriander leaves
Vegetable oil or choice (I always use coconut oil)
Optional: garlic/ onion to your taste, chili powder/ crushed chili

Preparation

Dahl recipeWash the lentils thoroughly, until the water runs clear. Peel & grate the ginger. Cut the garlic/ onions if using. Peel & slide the carrots.Heat the oil in a wok. Add the mustard seeds and wait until they ‘pop’.  Add the freshly grated ginger (and garlic/ onion if using), stir until golden. Add the turmeric and cumin powder. Stir everything until the spices become very fragrant.

Add the carrots, stir fry to coat the carrots with the spices for 2 minutes.
Add the washed lentils, mix everything well.
Add 3 cups of filtered water, the bay leave and bring to boil. When the water boils, lower the heat, let the mixture simmer for about 15 minutes, make sure to keep on adding water if the mixture becomes dry. The dahl needs to ‘swim’.
Taste the mixture when the lentils become soft, then add salt & pepper to taste.
You can add half of the dahl mixture in a blender, blend it for a short while & add it back to the pan to have a more firm dahl.

Serve with quinoa or rice and add some freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice and coriander leaves.

This is a very hearty meal for cold winter nights but I admit I can eat it any day of the year. Try to experiment with different types of lentils, mung beans, etc. It’s also nice to add some coconut milk to your dahl for a softer flavour.

You can find all the ingredients in your local Indian or oriental shop. I prefer to buy mostly organic, most of the ingredients can also be found in your organic foodstore (except for garam masala I haven’t yet found an organic version in Brussels).